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Just wanted to know how many of you write from outlines and the pros and cons of soing so.

 

I always start with an  outline, but the characters don't always stay in the box, especially by the end of the story.

 

Tell me what you think.

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I don't outline at the beginning at all. I just begin to write and see what happens. After I have something on paper I'll review it and form a mental shape but to call it an outline would be exaggerating. :)

It's not a bad thing if they don't stay in the box anyway. If you need to constrain them to do so, it's better to get a different box. ;)
This one is the old argument is writing an art or a science? By which I mean is there a set process that can be scientifically reproduced or does the creativity just pour forth from the artistic side ofthe brain in a way that we dont readily understand?

For me I use a mixture of both. I have an idea (a goal on which the focus my thoughts) and then I let the story unfold from within. Set the backdrop (the canvas) with the scenes and use the brushes (my characters) to paint the picture in the method I would like to have as my theme (the plot).

But overall I think that with books, like with love, there are no set formulae that are universal, Just do what feels right for you.

We are what we think.

Good luck and ALWAYS have fun.
Here is a great quote from a little Spanish guy on art.

Art is not the application of a canon of beauty but what the instinct and the brain can conceive beyond any canon. When we love a woman we don't start measuring her limbs.
Pablo Picasso
Dearest Scribbler,
Your point is well taken by me. I often find my creative juices spilled all over a notebook and then hastily wipe them up and squeeze them out onto the page that I am writing. I find that outlines have an important function, however. They help one to remember where one has gone and where one is going. But I've always considered them as sponges, as I just iterated. . .they should remain flexible and full of holes to be filled with those creative juices.
Just a thought.

My best,
M.

scribbler said:
I don't outline at the beginning at all. I just begin to write and see what happens. After I have something on paper I'll review it and form a mental shape but to call it an outline would be exaggerating. :)

It's not a bad thing if they don't stay in the box anyway. If you need to constrain them to do so, it's better to get a different box. ;)
Do I write using an Outline? - I wish! lol

I'm young enough to have been taught such crazy subjects as 'Creative Writing' in school, and of course there we were whole heartedly taught to sit down, painstakingly plan each aspect of our story, even being asked to had in a copy of our plan before allowed to start our story... the same was true in our exams.

Unfortunately, the minute I left school, this practise ended! My mind is far too messy to structure it and make plans! lol. Usually what inspires me to write is an errant thought that sparks something within my scrapheap of a brain and immediately my brain runs away with the idea and starts planning out the whole story, I'm lucky if I can get a few notes down so I know roughly where I'm going before dialogue starts entering my head and I have to just start writing the real deal!

And the times I did use plans? The story never ended up how I had planned! Plan... wasted! lol
Since I'm yet to write anything of great length, I can afford to be freer than most I imagine, Mark. Thanks for the sponge analogy. I like that. :)

Mark A. Santomieri said:
Dearest Scribbler,
Your point is well taken by me. I often find my creative juices spilled all over a notebook and then hastily wipe them up and squeeze them out onto the page that I am writing. I find that outlines have an important function, however. They help one to remember where one has gone and where one is going. But I've always considered them as sponges, as I just iterated. . .they should remain flexible and full of holes to be filled with those creative juices.
Just a thought.

My best,
M.

scribbler said:
I don't outline at the beginning at all. I just begin to write and see what happens. After I have something on paper I'll review it and form a mental shape but to call it an outline would be exaggerating. :)

It's not a bad thing if they don't stay in the box anyway. If you need to constrain them to do so, it's better to get a different box. ;)
LOL, Cheryl I think you and I were separated at birth. ;) Nice to know I'm not alone in my runaway thoughts. And you're a sight for sore eyes! It's nice to see you back.

Cheryl said:
Do I write using an Outline? - I wish! lol

I'm young enough to have been taught such crazy subjects as 'Creative Writing' in school, and of course there we were whole heartedly taught to sit down, painstakingly plan each aspect of our story, even being asked to had in a copy of our plan before allowed to start our story... the same was true in our exams.

Unfortunately, the minute I left school, this practise ended! My mind is far too messy to structure it and make plans! lol. Usually what inspires me to write is an errant thought that sparks something within my scrapheap of a brain and immediately my brain runs away with the idea and starts planning out the whole story, I'm lucky if I can get a few notes down so I know roughly where I'm going before dialogue starts entering my head and I have to just start writing the real deal!

And the times I did use plans? The story never ended up how I had planned! Plan... wasted! lol
To Sean and all:

Writing is both an art and a science and further, and most specifcally, a craft. We, indeed, are what we think. We, as writers, are compelled to share what we think. This is the essence of our craft. It behooves us to tell our stories and our fantasies in the best possible manor. Without the written word, the world would be poorer for the loss. There is the single exception of "Legalese"; I believe The Bard said it best: "kill them all". Or some such.
With my new novel, Free Clinic, coming out soon to a book store near you, I implore all of you to pay heed to the possibilites of your own creativity. Failure is never an option for us creative types. Success is just around the bend.

Stay good, clever and kind.

My Best,
M.A. Santomieri
Thanks for the continued encouragement I receive from all here at Authors.com it is a great place to send some time recharging batteries and sharing thoughts and experiences.

I must say, I always need to have some idea no matter how faint of where I am going or the mess is just that, a mess. That's how I work, though I would never presume to tell any one else how they should persue their craft. However from one well known artist this quote is entirely accurate in my experience.

"An idea is a point of departure and no more. As soon as you elaborate it, it becomes transformed by thought."
Pablo Picasso

My second book is also about to be published and available the world over via the internet. "A First Christmas, Friends and Festivity". Always remember to follow yor dreams. Sorry folks must go I have a little four year old at my side demanding attention.... Its a great life.



Mark A. Santomieri said:
To Sean and all:

Writing is both an art and a science and further, and most specifcally, a craft. We, indeed, are what we think. We, as writers, are compelled to share what we think. This is the essence of our craft. It behooves us to tell our stories and our fantasies in the best possible manor. Without the written word, the world would be poorer for the loss. There is the single exception of "Legalese"; I believe The Bard said it best: "kill them all". Or some such.
With my new novel, Free Clinic, coming out soon to a book store near you, I implore all of you to pay heed to the possibilites of your own creativity. Failure is never an option for us creative types. Success is just around the bend.

Stay good, clever and kind.

My Best,
M.A. Santomieri

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