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Is your son or daughter experiencing his or her first sexual experience? Not all contraceptives are suitable for adolescents. We show what resources gynecologists recommend for teenagers and what they advise against. In any case, tell your child that the condom is the only method that protects against sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS. Adolescents are more likely to have an unwanted pregnancy if they do not follow the correct contraceptives. You will be able to understand the topic very easily by watching this educational story from http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMv0nI3F_RldID3qzBtZnCQ.

 

Suitable contraceptives

 

Condoms

 

Only condoms simultaneously protect against unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and AIDS. They have no side effects - latex allergies are rare - and are a way for guys to take contraception in their hands. They must not be used together with greasy lubricants, creams, or chemical contraceptives. However, it is not easy to handle condoms safely, so teenagers should "practice" before. Condoms are not safe when misused - in combination with a hormonal contraceptive; adolescents can protect themselves "twice."

 

Pill

 

The hormones contained in the pill make sure that no oocytes mature. The pill is convenient and therefore quite popular, but has a number of side effects, such as headaches. For contraception to be safe, it is imperative that you take it properly and on time - perhaps you can assist your daughter in the beginning until she has more routine. Up to the 20th birthday, take over most of the health insurance costs.

 

Mini pill

 

Unlike the pill, it does not contain any estrogen, only progestins, and causes a mucous plug to be formed in front of the cervix. The mini-pill must be taken very punctually - always at the same time - and every day of the month without interruption. If taken more than three hours late, contraceptive protection will decrease significantly. Menstruation is often irregular; it can breakthrough bleeding occurs; some women complain of breast tenderness, headaches, mood changes, and sexual aversion.

 

Hormone implant

 

This is a small plastic stick that is inserted under the skin by the doctor on the upper arm. There are hormones for three years, which - similar to the pill - prevent the ripening of egg cells. The hormone swab is suitable for women who cannot tolerate the hormone estrogen, and there are also no mistakes in taking the pill. Possible side effects, however, include pimples, headaches, depression, and relatively common bleeding disorders.

Contraceptive pills

Similar to the pill, this hormonal method prevents monthly ovulation. The patch is 4.5 x 4.5 cm in size and is glued on for seven days, after three weeks a week break is inserted. Because the hormones are absorbed through the skin, it is particularly suitable for women who often vomit or suffer from frequent diarrhea. The patch can cause redness of the skin, but rarely is it so strong that it cannot be used. In the summer, however, it is unpleasant for some girls to wear a bikini with the bandage.

Spiral

The small piece of plastic is placed in the uterus by the doctor and can remain there for a maximum of five years, preventing sperm from rising and fertilized egg cells from nesting. There are copper and hormone spirals that work differently. Increased menstrual problems and an increased risk of tubal inflammation are examples of side effects. Women who have already born a child are better off the spiral, but there is no reason to exclude them for young women as a method of contraception. But first you should be well advised.

Vaginal Ring

The soft plastic ring is inserted into the vagina, where it releases hormones continuously. After 21 days, the vaginal ring is removed, in the seven-day break; the woman gets her menstrual period. The vaginal ring offers - in contrast to the pill - also for women contraceptive, suffering from gastrointestinal discomfort, frequent vomiting or diarrhea. The ring has side effects similar to the pill, but in some women it can cause vaginal irritation and vaginal discharge.

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