Authors.com

Authors, Writers, Publishers, and Book Readers

I am a new author of children's books. I have written 2 so far and have been working on 3 & 4. My biggest dilemma is finding an illustrator. Do I even need one before trying to submit a manuscript? Or can anyone help me in locating one.
Thanks.

Views: 44

Replies to This Discussion

My understanding is that publishers like to assign their own illustrators, Christine. Unless you're planning to go down the self publishing route, I don't think that's something you need worry about. Most freelancer and job sites have a section for illustrators/artists. Try Googling "freelance illustrator jobs" or "freelance illustrator wanted" and you'll find sites where they are.

Kay is correct. If you're going with a traditional pub., they'll want to take care of it. If you're doing it on your own, I recommend CreateSpace as the medium. As for illustrators, check out guru.com. It's amazing how many talented people are out there.

Good luck!

I was wondering about that too as well, I am an artist and i am doing concept drawings as to what I would like to see. Is that a turn off for publishers?

That's my concept drawing of Man on the Mountain

Gavion E. Chandler~

''Man is his own devil.'

Many paths to take. Looks like you have the option to create your own illustrations. Keep in  mind, the more your publisher does the less you get in return ($). 

My company http://MotherSpider.com offers 3 types of contracts to the clients we accept based on your budget. Most go with the low hourly payment during production with a 20% residual of all sales. The opposite spectrum of contracts and this is the case for just about all illustrators, you pay a huge fee to own the image out right. And that is for each image. Gets a bit costly for children's books.

We are a 1-stop company for all production, publishing, and marketing for books, so feel free to ask questions. Good luck on your book either way.

RSS

© 2014   Created by Authors.com.

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service