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I have trouble not letting my hackles rise if my writing's criticized. Doesn't matter how constructive it is either. No, I'm joking. :) I don't mind constructive criticism.

It's the one line comments like "I don't like it" I hate. Family are the worst for that!

Please, if you're going to tell me you don't like it at least explain what and why! Is it one line, one word, one paragraph, the whole story? Then I can examine it and see if I think it's justified.

Actually I feel the same about praise. Tell me more about what you liked so I know! Only I don't look at that so closely. I just bask in it. ;)

How do you honestly view criticism?

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When I first started to write in my spare time and even at School during classes instead of doing my work, my friends would always be interested in reading it, even though I wasn't particularly happy with what I had written. They would always tell me that it was good, interesting, funny, all different things, but when I read it I couldn't see what it was they saw in it. Once or twice I received more negative feedback saying that I repeated myself too much or spent too much time trying to explain how this one thing happened, but I had an excuse for those; it helped me though.
That's the main reason why I started uploading my work onto my website over on Freewebs and onto Cuckleburr Times; I wanted feedback from people I didn't know, people who wouldn't tell me that it was good just to spare my feelings, and all the work I put up was liked, or at least was found interesting. I got help from these strangers and was given tips on self editing, dialogue, and everything else that I needed to work on, not to mention the archive of articles that I read over looking for inspiration and tips, which also helped me a lot.

So in short, any criticism that I received, whether it was positive or negative, I worked with it, I adapted my style so that I wasn't repeating the same sentences over and over again and reduced the amount of detail that I put into my paragraphs, making it a little easier for the readers to understand, without confusion, what was going on.
Andrew, you've got a great attitude there and one some people twice your age are yet to master. It takes guts to show your writing outside of the safety of family and friends precisely for the reasons you mention. Some people are happy to keep it within their own circle and some need more and want to know what strangers will think as you say. I was like you, I always wanted outside opinions too. :)

To answer scribbler, I think so much on how you handle criticism depends on your own confidence in your writing. When I was new to putting it out there on forums and such, I did so with the full expectation of being shot down in flames by more experienced writers and poets. I could get 19 positive replies and 1 negative or neutral one out of 20, and that was the one that I'd focus on. Silly really on my part but that was all to do with confidence. Now I look at criticism and praise more objectively and take it all with a pinch of salt. At the end of the day, what matters is that I'm happy with the piece myself and I can still enjoy the process.

(I feel Andrew is far too modest about his writing. This is his piece, Half Blood. )

Andrew Kunz said:
When I first started to write in my spare time and even at School during classes instead of doing my work, my friends would always be interested in reading it, even though I wasn't particularly happy with what I had written. They would always tell me that it was good, interesting, funny, all different things, but when I read it I couldn't see what it was they saw in it. Once or twice I received more negative feedback saying that I repeated myself too much or spent too much time trying to explain how this one thing happened, but I had an excuse for those; it helped me though.
That's the main reason why I started uploading my work onto my website over on Freewebs and onto Cuckleburr Times; I wanted feedback from people I didn't know, people who wouldn't tell me that it was good just to spare my feelings, and all the work I put up was liked, or at least was found interesting. I got help from these strangers and was given tips on self editing, dialogue, and everything else that I needed to work on, not to mention the archive of articles that I read over looking for inspiration and tips, which also helped me a lot.

So in short, any criticism that I received, whether it was positive or negative, I worked with it, I adapted my style so that I wasn't repeating the same sentences over and over again and reduced the amount of detail that I put into my paragraphs, making it a little easier for the readers to understand, without confusion, what was going on.
Criticism, whether we like it about our writing or not, it does make you stop and think when writing future pieces, which can make them better. One thing that should not be viewed as criticism is style, every writer has their own style and not every reader is going to like it.

Personally, I can handle it and in many ways, and I think it makes me a stronger writer. But, I do take it with a grain of salt, depending on what the criticism is about.

On a side note, Kay Elizabeth is right; Andrew can draw his readers into his story as it unfolds.
You can't please all of the people all of the time. I keep that in mind a lot. :) My worst critic is my mother and I like that because I know she's been absolutely honest. At the end of the day each of us can decide whether to accept it or disregard it. That was a good point about style, Sandra. We'd soon get bored stiff if we were all the same.

Sandra Kitchen said:
Criticism, whether we like it about our writing or not, it does make you stop and think when writing future pieces, which can make them better. One thing that should not be viewed as criticism is style, every writer has their own style and not every reader is going to like it.

Personally, I can handle it and in many ways, and I think it makes me a stronger writer. But, I do take it with a grain of salt, depending on what the criticism is about.

On a side note, Kay Elizabeth is right; Andrew can draw his readers into his story as it unfolds.
I don't like it....there is people who are really mean about it and it p.me.o. I understand if they explain what I did wrong and what not but I don't like the meanies out there. I like nice criticism even if they don't like they can say it in a nice way.
Thanks for a very honest answer Vivi. Criticism comes with the job if you want to write. Some of the mean people are just jealous of talent or grudge success that's not theirs. I've met downright bitchy failed writers. Those that can't handle being failures and like to feel big by belittling other writers when what they should be doing is improving their own, ignore them! Don't even bother replying.

Just don't let that stop you from putting it out there. The failures hate that LOL. ;)

You'll learn gradually how to tell the difference between those trolls and genuine help when it's offered. Ignore the nonconstructive comments. In fact, ignore the constructive ones too if you want. In the end, it's your writing and your decision. :)

Viviana Arteaga said:
I don't like it....there is people who are really mean about it and it p.me.o. I understand if they explain what I did wrong and what not but I don't like the meanies out there. I like nice criticism even if they don't like they can say it in a nice way.
Thanks thats what I like to do. I actually found out that my ex best friend was very jealous of my writing.
She'd give me a compliment then throw out a big hidden insult. One of the main reasons we are not friends anymore.

scribbler said:
Thanks for a very honest answer Vivi. Criticism comes with the job if you want to write. Some of the mean people are just jealous of talent or grudge success that's not theirs. I've met downright bitchy failed writers. Those that can't handle being failures and like to feel big by belittling other writers when what they should be doing is improving their own, ignore them! Don't even bother replying.

Just don't let that stop you from putting it out there. The failures hate that LOL. ;)

You'll learn gradually how to tell the difference between those trolls and genuine help when it's offered. Ignore the nonconstructive comments. In fact, ignore the constructive ones too if you want. In the end, it's your writing and your decision. :)

Viviana Arteaga said:
I don't like it....there is people who are really mean about it and it p.me.o. I understand if they explain what I did wrong and what not but I don't like the meanies out there. I like nice criticism even if they don't like they can say it in a nice way.

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